USS TUNNY (APSS/LPSS-282) and AGENT ORANGE EXPOSURE INFORMATION 1967-1969

 

Introduction

 

     Positioning information has been found contained in USS TUNNY (APSS-282) Deck Logs that clearly puts the diesel electric powered USS TUNNY (APSS and LPSS-282) inside the 12 NM Territorial Limits of the North Vietnam Coastline. Should you need supporting evidence provided you served on the Tunny during Vietnam Era, Ray Olszewski can tell you when you reported on board, when you were transferred off, and includes comments about your promotions, qualifying in submarines, captain's masts, etc.  Contact Ray at:  ROlszewski@aol.com for that information, or you can call him at: (703) 244-5678.  The information in Ray's database was used to identify those who served on Tunny from 1942 through 1959 and is backed up by the Tunny Muster Reports. 

 

     The information that follows is the work of former Tunny Radioman Robert William White and former Tunny Yeoman Ray Olszewski.  Former Tunny Seaman David Buehn holds copies of Tunny Deck Logs and is available to provide support as needed.  David can be contacted at his email address, dbcolts@aol.com. The information that is presented is in chronological order and includes both the positioning information found in associated USS TUNNY Deck Logs followed by charts. Those positions that are bolded in red are positions located within the 12NM territorial limits of the Republic of North Vietnam (RVN) coastline. 


October 1967:  USS TUNNY (APSS-282) SPECOPS Deployment #5 (5 Oct 67 to 20 Oct 67)

with UDT-11 Det "C" Embarked

References: CTG 70.9 MovOrd 010110Z October 1967 and CTF 76 260105Z September 1967

(Click on the Yes to access image of associated Deck Log)

Commanding Officer, Commander Wiliam Carbine Green, USN

 

Date
Time
Latitude
Longitude
Deck Log Avail?
10/5/1967 1200 14 43.3N 119 55.5E  
10/5/1967 2000 14 50.3N 119 26.1E  
10/6/1967 0800 14 50.5N 116 0.0E  
10/6/1967 1200 14 51.5N 115 11.2E  
10/6/1967 2000 15 11.4N 113 26.3E  
10/7/1967 0800 15 34.9N 110 55.0E  
10/7/1967 1200 15 43.0N 110 8.4E  
10/7/1967 2000 15 56.5N 109.21.4E  
10/8/1967 0800 16 26.1N 108 5.7E Yes
10/8/1967 1200 16 25.0N 108 28.2E  
10/8/1967 2000 16 34.5N 108 31.2E  
10/9/1967 0800 16 20.1N 108 27.5E  
10/9/1967 1200 16 28.7N 108 8.8E Yes
10/9/1967 2000 16 25.7N 108 10.2E Yes
10/10/1967 0800 16 25.8N 107 57.7E  
10/10/1967 1200 16 26.1N 107 55.6E  
10/10/1967 2000 16 27.0N 107 50.5E  
10/11/1967 0800 16 42.8N 108 37.2E  
10/11/1967 1200 15 44.9N 108 39.8E  
10/11/1967 2000 15 38.3N 108 32.5E  
10/12/1967 0800 16 5.6E 108 30.8E  
10/12/1967 1200 14 38.7N 108 52.6E See note (1)
10/12/1967 2000 15 24.7N 108 47.4E  
10/13/1967 0800 15 7.2N 109 10.8E  
10/13/1967 1200 15 4.1N 109 1.2E  
10/13/1967 2000 15 10.0N 108 56.9E  
10/14/1967 0800 15 3.5N 109 1.2E  
10/14/1967 1200 15 1.3N 109 3.3E  
10/14/1967 2000 15 4.1N 108 56.3E  
10/15/1967 0800 14 34.1N 109 15.3E  
10/15/1967 1200 14 37.6N 109 6.9E  
10/15/1967 2000 14 33.9N 109 14.8E  
10/16/1967 0800 14 19.5N 109 16.5E  
1016/1967 1200 14 16.6N 109 15.0E  
10/16/1967 2000 14 21.0N 109 29.1E  
10/17/1967 0800 14 17.3N 109 13.2E  
10/17/1967 1200 14 21.2N 109 9.5E  
10/17/1967 2000 14 3.3N 109 23.2E  
10/18/1967 0800 14 14.8N 109 17.2E  
10/18/1967 1200 14 5.5N 109 23.0E  
10/18/1967 2000 14 8.0N 110 58.1E  
10/19/1967 0800 14 24.0N 112 59.7E  
10/19/1967 1200 14 22.4E 114 6.0E  
10/19/1967 2000 14 32.8N 116 2.6E  
10/20/1967 0800 14 37.1N 118 40.0E  
10/20/1967 1200 14 46.5N 119 15.0E  

 

Note 1:  White reports this position plots on land and is in error.

    

     The following six (6) charts were produced by Robert W. White and support the above positions extracted from the Tunny's Deck Logs. White used Google Earth was used for these images.

  

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2

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4

5

6

     In addition to the foregoing information, the following is a draft report of the Tunny's operations during SPECOP Deployment #5. This draft report was written by Tunny's Commanding Officer, William Green, which when positioning data was added would be appropriately classified and submitted as a "patrol report" to the U.S. Navy's Chief of Naval Operations (CNO).  Attempts to obtain the classified reports have been unsuccessful, and they remain highly sought after.  Recommend that the Veteran's Administration pursue determining they are available and reviewing them if they need further evidence of the Tunny being within the 12NM territorial waters as the reports will describe that Tunny on many occasions were required to surface to provide support to the UDT/SEAL teams in launching and retrieving them during their mission operations. For ease of finding the times Tunny had to be on the surface during this SPECOP Deployment the report addresses, the word surface is bolded.  For background and description of Tunny's UDT Support Operations, click here which will take you to the Background section of this posting.

 

DRAFT

Summary of USS Tunny (APSS 282) Operations

Deployment #5

5 October - 20 October 1967

UDT-11 Det "C" Embarked

 

Mission.   USS TUNNY (APSS 282) was directed by CTG 70.9 msg 010110Z Oct 1967 to conduct UDT beach surveys, take beach panoramic photography, and gather certain reconnaissance information at NIS beaches 2, 8, 14, 17, 20, and 22, Republic of Viet Nam, during the period 5-18 October 1967.  This mission was to be conducted in a covert manner and was directed in response to CTF 76 msg 260105Z Sep 1967.

 

Pre-deployment Preparation.  TUNNY was at the U.S. Naval Base, Subic Bay, for six days proceeding deployment for this mission.  Three days were devoted to voyage repairs following a transit from Yokosuka, Japan.  The remaining three days were spent conducting training exercises with Detachment ‘C”, UDT-11.  This training included dry and wet deck launches and recoveries, bottomed swimmer lockout and lockin operations, and vectoring practice.  These evolutions were conducted both night and day.  Upon completion of training and provisioning, TUNNY departed Subic Bay on 5 October 1967 with Detachment “C” UDT-11 embarked.  The transit across the South China Sea was marked by heavy weather.

  

8 October.   TUNNY arrived off NIS 2.  Due to 8-10 foot waves, 15-20 knot winds, occasional rain and poor visibility the proposed recon of NIS (North Sector) was postponed.

 

9 October.  8-12 ft. waves and 20-30 kt. Winds precluded a UDT survey.  A photo recon of NIS 2 (South Sector) was attempted from a range of 5600 yards however the results obtained were too poor to gather any useful information due to bad visibility.   Despite heavy weather depth control was good enough to allow operating submerged with 15 feet of water under the keel.

 

10 October.  An underway photo panorama was obtained from 3000 yards off NIS 2 (North Sector) in the morning.  The results obtained were again too poor to be useful due to low visibility.  At 1028H, immediately following completion of the photography, an armed helicopter of the Army “huey” type was observed firing into the water 2000 yards astern of the periscope.  TUNNY was then on course 310T, speed 3 kts. at a depth of 55 feet with 10/15 feet under the keel, with #1 scope up.  The apparent firing axis was 90 degrees to TUNNY’s course.  TUNNY immediately turned seaward with periscopes down.  The gunfire continued and was distinctly heard on the BQR-2B sonar and the UQC underwater telephone.   Five minutes later, when the firing had stopped a quick scope observation showed the Huey flying across the stern with the starboard door gunner commencing to fire in the direction of the periscope which was immediately lowered.  Depth of water under the keel at this time was 154 ft. TUNNY continued to open seaward and random gunfire could be heard for he net 15 minutes. Observation showed the first helo had been joined by a second.  Both helos had remained in the area where the shooting had commenced and were not trailing TUNNY.  The helos ceased firing and opened to the North.  Throughout this action a PCF was patrolling in the area.  Attempts were made to contact the helos or any Market Time unit on 301 mcs. When the periscope was exposed.  Communications were established with CTF 115 on ckt. S2a and a report of the incident made to him.

 

At 1800 TUNNY bottomed 2810 yards seaward of the right flank of NIS 2 (North Sector).  At this time the swells were 6-8 feet shoreward with a cross current of 2 kts. to the south.  TUNNY was ballasted 56,000 lbs. heavy to stay on the bottom, but the weather was such that she was lifted by the swells and turned by the current until she was 90 degrees from the heading on which she bottomed.  UDT could not operate in these conditions and the survey of the beach was cancelled.

 

Shortly after bottoming another helo was seen firing at the water, 3000 yards seaward.  TUNNY was definitely not the target at this time.  AT 2015 TUNY unbottomed and opened seaward for a transit to NIS 8.

 

CO’s Comment:  my immediate thought following this afternoon’ firing incident was that TUNNY was being attacked by the helos after they had seen my periscope during the photo recon.  After considering that PHU BAI airfield is only 7 miles inland from NIS 2, and that the near by PCF did not join the helos in shooting our way, I began to suspect that this was just a random test of the helo’s guns at which TUNNY was a very close range spectator.  The firing observed this evening confirmed my evaluation.  At a subsequent rendezvous with the CTG 1154.1 Operations Officer it was learned that a helo attack on an object in our area had not be reported to his office, the “clearing house” for al off shore targets.  Additionally it was learned that the aircraft’s rules of engagement preclude immediate attacks on any contact at sea without first obtaining clearance to do so.

 

                11 October.  TUNNY bottomed 630 yards off the right flank of NIS 8 at 1433.  A sweep photo panorama was obtained from this position.  Conditions were acceptable for lockout operations and 20 UDT swimmers with three IBS were locked out by 2230.  The IBS were vectored to the beach but upon deploying the swimmers it became apparent that a survey could not be conducted.  There was a strong northerly littoral current at the surf zone with 15 kts of on-shore wind.  The surf zone was 200 yards wide with 6-8 foot breakers 50% plunging, 4 seconds period.  The swimmers were recovered and the IBS vectored back to the periscope.  TUNNY unbottomed; backed seaward with the boat I tow and we deck recovered the IBS without further incident at 0308.

 

                12 October.  A rendezvous with CTG 115.1 Operations Officer was made at 0623.  Measures to avoid mutual interference were discussed and he was thoroughly briefed on our intentions.  Current intelligence on our objective beaches was obtained.  On completion of the rendezvous TUNNY transited to NIS 9.

 

                A successful submerged approach was made and TUNNY bottomed 2900 yards off NIS 9.  A sweep photo panorama was obtained at 1650.

 

                The UDT were locked out by 2050 and were vectored to the left flank.  On completion of their survey they were vectored back to TUNNY, periscope towed to sea and wet deck recovered without incident.

 

CO’s Comment:  Today’s operation was a classic in simplicity and accuracy.  Weather and sea conditions moderated, which along with favorable geographic position of the objective beach enable this recon to be successfully completed.

 

                21 October.   At 1529 TUNNY bottomed 5900 yards off NIS 14 and conducted a sweep photo recon.  The long range to the beach precluded paddling the entire distance by the UDT therefore at 2015 TUNNY battle surfaced, dry deck launched three motorized IBS and rebottomed in place in 13 minutes.  The UDT were vectored to the beach., completed a survey and were vectored back to the ship.

 

CO’s Comment.  A new vectoring range of 5900 yards was established.  Previously the greatest distance for vectoring UDT was 4200 yards.  A unique display of ingenuity using the equipment on hand was necessary to accomplish this.  The technique of using pingers and a NAE jammer is discussed in Comments and Recommendations section.

 

                14 October.  At 0245, the UDT having returned, TUNNY battle surfaced, recovered the motorized IBS and opened seaward.

 

The weather grew progressively worse throughout the day. An underway photo panorama was obtained of NIS 15 at 1400.

 

                At 1423 TUNNY bottomed 3080 yards off NIS 15.  The long range again necessitated motorized IBS.  TUNNY battle surfaced at 2113 and dry deck launched three IBS.  The weather was poor with 4-8 ft. seas and 20 kts. of wind, marginal conditions but it was agreed to try for the beach.  TUNNY bottomed in place but the IBS rapidly ran into difficulty.  One motor stopped and could not be restarted.  The boats were swept south by the wing and only with difficulty made it back up to TUNNY.  Following a battle surface, the IBS were recovered and TUNNY opened seaward. 

 

                15 October.  At 0530 while lying to surfaced off NIS 17 TUNNY was detected at a range of 30,000 yards on radar by USS WILHOITE (DER 397) in here Market Time patrol area.  When TUNNY submerged at 0609 she was evaluated as a “sinker” by WILHOITE at a range of 15,000.  WILHOITE closed to investigate.  TYUNNY commenced snorkeling but when WILHOITE had closed to 7,000 yards snorkeling was secured.  WILHOITE had not detected the snorkel on radar but gained sonar contact at 2000 yards following a search plan executed at datum.  TUNNY identified herself by UQU at 0709 following “UNCLE Joe” by WILHOITE.  

 

                16 October.  At 0800 TUNNY was submerged off NIS 20.  Although the swells off NIS 20 were 6-8 ft., the wind was slight.  Duet to the high swells an accurate surf observation by periscope could not be obtained.  In order to make a decision to conduct or cancel a survey of this beach, a good surf observation was necessary.  TUNNY opened seaward, surfaced, and contacted a near-by PCF.  At 1040 the UDT OinC and leading petty officer boarded the PCF which proceeded to the beach..  Observation showed the surf zone to be 100 yards wide, breakers 6-9 ft. high, 50% spilling and a strong southerly current.  A UDT recon could not be conducted covertly in these conditions with any accuracy or required degree of safety.  The UDT men were returned to TUNNY who remained off shore waiting for better weather.  By 2000 the winds were from 095 at 15 knots, seas 095 state 2 and swells 7-10 ft.  The proposed survey of NIS 20 (North Sector) was postponed.

 

                17 October.  At 1100 an underway photo panorama of NIS 20 (North Sector) and NIS 20  (South Sector) was obtained at a range of 1500 yards.  At this range thee was 45-50 ft. of water under the keel at all times due to a steep gradient.  Sea Conditions were the same as the previous night although the wind had increased to 20 kts.  The breakers could be seen crashing on the beach.   During the photo recon TUNNY rolled 6-10 degrees in the trough and bucked a 2 kt. southerly current.  A sweep panorama of the entire length of NIS 20 was obtained at a range of 3500 yards off beach center.  As conditions would not permit a UDT survey, TUNNY commenced a snorkel transit to NIS 22.

 

                18 October.    A sweep photo panorama was obtained of NIS 22 from a range of 3600 yards at 1100.  Breakers could be seen crashing on the beach with spray flying 20 ft. in the air.  Winds were from 340 degrees speed 26 kts, seas from 340 degrees State 3.  It was obvious a UDT survey could not be conducted in these conditions.  The mission was terminated and course set for Subic Bay.

 


April and May 1968:  USS TUNNY (APSS-282) SPECOPS Deployment #7 (16 April 1968 to 3 May 1968)

References: CTG 70.9 MovOrd 149-68 and 178-68

Commanding Officer:  Commander John F. Tate, USN

 

     The following are positions of the USS TUNNY (APSS-282) extracted from Tunny's Deck Logs by Robert W. White. The positions bolded in red are those located within the 12NM territorial limits of the RVN coastline.

 

Date Time Latitude Longitude
4/17/1968 0800 14.50.0N 115.14.2E
4/17/1968 1200 14.51.0N 114.33.9E
4/17/1968 2000 14.55.0N 113.39.5E
4/18/1968 0800 14.59.0N 110.50.5E
4/18/1968 1200 15.24.0N 109.57.9E
4/18/1968 2000 15.37.5N 109.12.0E
4/19/1968 0800 15.39.3N 108.36.8E
4/19/1968 1200 15.38.5N 108.32.0E
4/19/1968 2000 15.38.0N 108.31.5E
4/20/1968 0800 15.07.6N 109.17.3E
4/20/1968 1200 15.10.1N 108.58.1E
4/20/1968 2000 15.10.1N 108.58.1E
4/21/1968 0800 14.34.3N 109.11.5E
4/21/1968 1200 14.35.3N 109.05.7E
4/21/1968 2000 14.35.eN 109.05.7E
4/22/1968 0800 14.34.7N 109.16.3E
4/22/1968 1200 14.35.2N 109.16.7E
4/22/1968 2000 14.34.1N 109.03.2E
4/23/1968 0800 14.33.8N 109.32.5E
4/23/1968 1200 15.35.6N 109.15.5E
4/23/1968 2000 15.59.4N 109.07.2E
4/24/1968 0800 14.36.7N 109.24.2E
4/24/1968 1200 14.38.6N 109.17.3E
4/24/1968 2000 14.33.0N 109.05.4E
4/25/1968 0800 14.34.1N 109.12.6E
4/25/1968 1200 14.46.6N 109.02.9E
4/27/1968 0800 14.32.8N 109.25.7E
4/27/1968 1200 14.39.1N 109.10.5E
4/27/1968 2000 14.46.2N 109.02.6E
4/28/1968 0800 14.38.0N 109.14.4E
4/28/1968 1200 14.32.8N 109.07.2E
4/29/1968 0800 14.35.8N 109.14.6E
4/29/1968 1200 14.39.8N 109.09.8E
4/29/1968 2000 15.06.9N 109.06.1E
4/30/1968 0800 15.04.5N 109.12.5E
4/30/1968 1200 14.57.4N 109.13.3E
4/30/1968 2000 15.08.9N 109.02.3E
5/1/1968 0800 15.01.4N 111.14.4E
5/1/1968 1200 15.03.5N 112.06.7E
5/1/1968 2000 14.59.0N 114.00.0E

 

     Positions below were extracted from Tunny's Deck Logs and are provided to support above plots. If actual logs are needed, please contact David Buehn. To create your own plot(s).  Google Earth was used for these images.

 

 

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3

4

5

6

The following chart was produced "for effect" and created to along with the foregoing. This chart shows Tunny's position was 1,292 yards (by Bob's calculations using Google Earth) from the RVN Beach.

 

7


Issues

 

The following two issues relative to USS Tunny Veterans being exposed to Agent Orange chemicals during the Vietnam War include:

 

(1)  Veterans who served on USS Tunny (APSS/LPSS-282) are entitled to VA Benefits for compensation caused by exposure to Agent Orange; and,

(2)  The Veterans Administration must add the USS Tunny (APSS/LPSS-282) to its list titled Navy and Coast Guard Ships Associated with Service in Vietnam and Exposure to Herbicide Agents published on March 1, 2019.  This list is also known unofficially as the “Brown Water Ship’s List”.

https://www.va.gov/disability/eligibility/hazardous-materials-exposure/agent-orange/vietnam-waters/, accessed 6/2/2019

https://www.va.gov/shiplist-agent-orange.pdf, accessed 6/2/2019

 

It is clear that the Veterans Administration puts the "burden of proof" on the veteran to provide the evidence that Tunny was within 12NM of the RVN in order to be considered for compensation.  In the case of substantiating Bob White's being onboard Tunny at the time, here are his personnel diary (muster report) entries: (Date of Entry and activity recorded) which were extracted from Ray Olszewski's Tunny Personnel Database.  The highlighted entries are dates of Tunny's SPECOPS Deployments which are not contained in the muster reports. These were for effect as well to show that Radioman White was on board Tunny when it conducted ten (10) SPECOP Deployments as noted.

 

8-26-67 White, Robert William, RMSN REC FOR DUTY from ENl Basic Submarine School, NLON, Conn.

10-5-67 Special Operations, RVN Start #5

10-20-67 Special Operations, RVN End #5

10-22-67 White, Robert William, RMSN Ch rate to RM3. CH ACDUOBLI from: 3 AUG 70 00 00 to: 3 AUG 70 00 24. Reason: Executed agreement to extend enlistment.

10-26-67 Special Operations, RVN Start #6

11-20-67 Special Operations, RVN End #6

4-16-68 Special Operations, RVN Start #7

5-3-68 Special Operations, RVN Ends #7

5-11-68 White, Robert William CH designator to SS (8 mos, 15 days)

6-28-68 Special Operations, RVN Start #8

7-19-68 Special Operations, RVN End #8

8-10-68 Special Operations, RVN Start #9

8-27-68 Special Operations, RVN End #9

10-16-68 White, Robert William CH rate to RM2 per exam results.

10-17-68 Special Operations, RVN Start #10

11-7-68 Special Operations, RVN End #10

1-22-69 Special Operations, RVN Start #11

1-24-69 Tunny commenced SPECOPS

2-6-69 Special Operations, RVN End #11

2-11-69 Special Operations, RVN Start #12

2-17-69 Special Operations, RVN End #12

4-11-69 Special Operations, RVN Start #13

4-22-69 Special Operations, RVN End #13

5-5-69 Special Operations, RVN Start #14

5-14-69 Special Operations, RVN End #14

5-17-69 White, Robert TRF to CO , USS ROCK (AGSS 274) HP San Diego, California for duty.


Background

 

     The following are images of typical UDT Operations that depict a Lockout and a Wet Deck Launch performed by USS Tunny (APSS and LPSS-282) during its time serving in Southeast Asia when its mission was to support Unconventional Warfare Operations.  One can clearly see that Tunny was on the surface during these operations. These operations included both members of UDT/SEAL teams and select personnel of the USS TUNNY.  A list of those former Tunny crewmembers who performed these operations follows the images. The images shown are all included in USS TUNNY: A History, Tribute, and Memoir by Raymond Vance Olszewski.  Refer to Chapter Eleven.

 

     According to the USS TUNNY (APSS-282) 1967 Command History, there were a total of 1,224 Lockout/Lockin cycles conducted.  See the attached copy of Tunny's Command History by clicking here. During the last SPECOPS that took place between 5 and 14 May 1969, the very last lock in on the Tunny was number 3,860 performed by RD3 Walter "Mole" Roberts of Burley, Idaho.  Roberts was a member of the UDT Det 13, Det "C".  Special thanks go to Steve Waterman, a former Navy Diver and Photographer's Mate, from South Thomaston, Maine who wrote an article entitled "The Last Vietnam SDV Operation Off the USS TUNNY (LPSS-282).  This article was published in the June 1996, Soldier of Fortune (SOF) magazine.

 

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 All of the Known Tunny Divers and Tigers

(Listed in Date Received on board Tunny)

Name and Rank/Rate

Notes

Date Reported to Tunny

Date Departed Tunny

# of SPECOPS

Deployments Made

Officer Personnel

Life, Richard Aaron, LT

 

1 October 1966

11 August 1967

4

O’Shea, Donald James,, LT

3

3 October 1966

27 July 1968

8

Young, Gerry Arnett, LT

 

5 January 1967

11 November 1968

10

Christman, Robert Harvey, LT

1

21 July 1967

28 June 1969

10

Enlisted Personnel

McGuire, Thomas Wayne, TM

1

30 September 1965

1 September 1968

9

Conrad, Terry Kay, TM

1, 2

5 July 1966

28 June 1969

14

Anderson, Kenneth Alfred, EM

3

30 September 1966

9 September 1968

8

Burkholder, Michael Jerome, EN

 

30 September 1966

22 May 1967

3

Calen, Vernon Dale, TM

 

30 September 1966

3 March 1969

12

Hogg, John Anthony, ET

3

30 September 1966

1 July 1967

4

Michael, Donald Wayne, EM

1

30 September 1966

22 December 1967

6

Rintz, Ronald, EN

3

30 September 1966

16 October 1968

9

Walters, James Jerry, EM

1

30 September 1966

28 June 1969

14

Watson, Frederick Manville, IC

1

30 September 1966

28 June 1969

14

Weltzien, Murdock John, EM

1

30 September 1966

7 July 1967

4

Wiley, Robert Dennis, MM

1, 3

30 September 1966

16 August 1967

4

Wood, Palmer Jess, EM

1

30 September 1966

29 June 1968

4

Woodall, James Dewayne, MM

1

20 October 1966

11 November 1968

6

Scott, Todd Allen, FT

1

20 December 1966

16 January 1969

9

Willis, Edward Wight, Jr., MM

1

20 May 1967

18 May 1969

11

McCready, Donald Leroy, EN

3

4 June 1967

16 January 1969

6

Barkis, Alexander John, TM

1

28 September 1967

27 May 1969

10

Rose, Thomas Ronald, MM

1, 2

21 October 1967

28 June 1969

9

Summary Chart Notes:

(1) Identified as a SCUBA Diver who received training either while serving on Perch or Tunny.

(2) Known to have been a Qualified Second Class Diver while on Tunny. There were two – Terry Conrad and Tom Rose.

(3) Known as a “Hard Core Asiatic” who served on Perch, Tunny and Grayback.

 

     The following chart shows all of the SPECOPS deployments made while in Southeast Asia supporting Unconventional Warfare Operations.  This chart was extracted from USS TUNNY: A History, Tribute, and Memoir written by Raymond Vance Olszewski.

 

Summary of APSS/LPSS Special Operations Support Deployments

Commanding Officer

Special Operations

From

To

Days

UDT Organization

Green

#1

9 February 1967

25 February 1967

27

UDT-12 1st Platoon

#2

27 March 1967

9 April 1967

13

UDT-11 2nd Platoon

#3

25 April 1967

20 May 1967

25

UDT-11 4th Platoon

#4

5 June 1967

11 June 1967

6

UDT-11 4th Platoon

#5

5 October 1967

20 October 1967

15

UDT-11 Det “C”

#6

26 October 1967

20 November 1967

25

UDT-11 Det “C”

Tate

#7

16 April 1968

3 May 1968

17

Unknown

#8

28 June 1968

19 July 1968

21

Unknown

#9

10 August 1968

27 August 1968

17

Unknown

#10

17 October 1968

7 November 1968

21

Unknown

#11

22 January 1969

6 February 1969

15

Unknown

#12

11 February 1969

17 February 1969

6

Unknown

#13

11 April 1969

22 April 1969

11

Unknown

#14

5 May 1969

14 May 1969

9

UDT-13 Det “C”

 

#1 thru #6 Total Days Deployed

110

 

 

#7 thru #14 Total Days Deployed

100

 

 

Total Days Deployed:

210

 

 

USS Tunny and other U.S. Navy submarines Support to Unconventional Warfare Operations.

 

The Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) website posted the following information in its article titled: Chapter 3 The Years of Combat, 1965-1968:  “…transport submarines Perch (APSS 313), Tunny (APSS 282), and Grayback (LPSS 574) carried Navy underwater demolition teams, SEALs, and South Vietnamese marines to points off prospective landing beaches.  Once there, the naval special warfare men silently exited the boats, swam or rowed rubber rafts through the surf, and carried out vital reconnaissance or other special operations ashore.”

https://www.history.navy.mil/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/b/by-sea-air-land-marolda/chapter-3-the-years-of-combat-1965-1968.html, accessed 6/2/2019

 

In support of the foregoing, the following is extracted from USS TUNNY: A History, Tribute, and Memoir by Raymond Vance Olszewski is provided.  This information describes the operations that were performed by members of Tunny's crew.  The book is available for purchased directly from the author on his website, www.olszewskienterprises.com.